Kidney Cancer

Kidney Cancer

Kidney cancer is a type of cancer that forms within the kidney. It can occur in one or both kidneys and normally forms in the lining of tiny tubules within the kidneys. The most common form of kidney cancer found in adults is renal cell carcinoma.

Symptoms of Kidney Cancer

Symptoms of kidney cancer include:

  • Blood in the urine
  • Back pain
  • Loss of appetite
  • Unexplained weight loss
  • Tiredness
  • Intermittent fever

Risk Factors of Kidney Cancer

Risk factors for kidney cancer include:

  • Old age
  • Smoking
  • Obesity
  • High blood pressure specifically hypertension
  • Long term dialysis
  • Family history of kidney cancer
  • Certain genetic conditions

Diagnosing Kidney Cancer

Your physician will most likely complete blood and urine tests to determine the cause of your symptoms. Additionally, a CT scan or MRI may be performed. The final diagnosis will be obtained via a kidney biopsy.

Stages of kidney cancer range from Stage I where the tumor is contained within the kidney and approximately 2 ¾ inches in diameter to Stage IV where the cancer has spread outside the kidney into the lymph nodes and other body organs.

Treating Kidney Cancer

The treatment for kidney cancer depends on multiple factors including the stage of the bladder cancer and the patient’s overall health. The most common type of treatment for kidney cancer is surgery. Surgical options typically include a partial nephrectomy or a radical nephrectomy.

Treatment options include:

Our physicians typically perform a robotic partial nephrectomy. A partial nephrectomy is performed when the tumors are relatively small. This procedure uses robotic technology to remove the part of the kidney containing the tumor. The robotic technique is a much newer and much less invasive technique in comparison to the traditional open technique.

Our physicians typically perform a robotic radical nephrectomy. A radical nephrectomy is performed for more extensive tumors. This procedure uses robotic technology to remove the entire kidney that contains the tumor. The robotic technique is a much newer and much less invasive technique in comparison to the traditional open technique.

When surgery is not feasible other potential treatments are possible, including cryoablation and radiofrequency ablation.

This treatment uses an x-ray guided needle to inject an electrical current through the tumor to heat and burn the cancer cells.